Mellon Faculty Stipends

Andrew W. Mellon Fund for Faculty Innovation
Request for Proposals

Overview

The Andrew W. Mellon Fund for Faculty Innovation at the Princeton University Art Museum encourages innovative curricular initiatives that use the Art Museum’s collections in a significant way. The goal of the program is to support interdisciplinary study throughout the University and thoughtful use of the Museum’s global collections by fostering collaboration between faculty and the Art Museum. Past proposals have resulted in courses in Anthropology, Art and Archaeology, Comparative Literature, English, French and Italian, German, History, Music, and Spanish and Portuguese. Grants are funded by an endowment from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of the Foundation’s ongoing commitment to strengthening the role of academic art museums in the teaching and training of undergraduate and graduate students.

Eligibility

All members of the Princeton University faculty are eligible to submit proposals. The normal expectation is that courses will be offered at least two times. Applicants should also have their project discussed and ratified in the appropriate venue in the department or program sponsoring the course; a written endorsement from the chair of the sponsoring department must be included in the proposal.

Funding and Additional Resources

Financial support is provided in the form of a one-time summer stipend in the amount of $10,000. The expectation for faculty who receive funding is that they will spend a substantial portion of the summer conducting in-depth research on the objects they plan to include in their course.

Museum curators are available to consult with faculty on specific portions of the collections and can direct them to additional research resources, including curatorial research files and bibliography. Juliana Ochs Dweck, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow for Collections Engagement, is available for guidance and feedback, and can direct interested faculty to the appropriate consulting curator(s) for their project. She may be reached at jochs@princeton.edu or at (609) 258-3945.

The Museum has study rooms that can be used for class meetings when objects from storage need to be brought out for discussion and examination by students and faculty. Study rooms can hold a maximum of 15 people and are available during regular office hours (Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.). Class meetings can also take place in the galleries during regular Museum hours (Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended hours on Thursdays to 10 p.m.). Please note that the Museum galleries are closed to the public on Mondays.

Faculty should consult with the appropriate curator regarding access to the collections and general scheduling consideration prior to submitting their proposal.

Access to the Collections

The Museum’s collections include more than 80,000 objects, with approximately five percent on view at any one time. Strengths include: Greek and Roman antiquities; medieval sculpture and metalwork; European and American painting, particularly from the nineteenth century; Chinese art, including the most important collection of calligraphy outside China; art of the Ancient Americas, including remarkable examples of Maya art; old master prints and drawings; a comprehensive collection of 27,000 photographs; and a growing collection of modern and contemporary art.

The entire collections database is now available for faculty online at artmuseum.princeton.edu. Click on Register to set up an account. Once you have done so, email Cathryn Goodwin, Manager of Collection Information and Access, at cathryng@princeton.edu. Let her know that you are a member of the faculty, and she will flag your account for full access.

Application Instructions

Proposals should include:

  • A course description (including the name of the consulting curator and the rationale for the course);

  • A course syllabus (including examples of objects that will be used);

  • An assessment plan taking into consideration what the instructor hopes the students will get out of a course designed around original works of art, and how the instructor will know that these goals have been achieved by the end of the semester; and

  • A written endorsement from the chair of the sponsoring department.

Selection Criteria

  • A successful proposal will include:

  • A clear and compelling course rationale;

  • Thoughtful consideration of the Museum’s collections and their inclusion in a significant manner throughout the course;

  • A demonstration of the viability of the course and the depth of the faculty member’s commitment to its development and implementation (including its relationship to other work underway); and

  • A plan for effective course assessment.

Submission Instructions

Proposals are currently being accepted on a rolling basis and should be submitted electronically to jochs@princeton.edu.