Panel Discussion: Reconsidering Ivory

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Panel Discussion: Reconsidering Ivory

Thursday, February 10, 2022 @ 5:30 pm

Considering works from medieval Europe as well as China and Japan in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, this interdisciplinary panel will explore various aspects of ivory, including the different techniques and tools used to carve it, transmission, and environmental issues related to sources of ivory. Speakers include Zoe Kwok, associate curator of Asian art; Sarah Anderson, lecturer in the Department of English; David Wilcove, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and public affairs and the High Meadows Environmental Institute; and Sarah Guerin, assistant professor in the Department of History of Art at the University of Pennsylvania. Introduced by Veronica White, Curator of Teaching and Learning, and Catherine Riihimaki, Research Director at 2NDNATURE Software. Moderated by Chris Newth, Associate Director for Collections and Exhibitions.This panel is co-sponsored by the Council on Science and Technology. 

Free registration via Zoom here. (when prompted, click to sign in as “attendee”)

This event will include live closed captions in both English and Spanish. English captions are available directly in the Zoom toolbar by clicking the "CC" icon. To access Spanish-language captioning, open Streamtext, where you can select “Spanish” to see the live captioning.

Para acceder a los subtítulos en varios idiomas, ingrese al seminario web de Zoom durante un evento en vivo, luego abra un navegador web separado para visitar esta página donde puede seleccionar "español" o el idioma de su elección.

LATE THURSDAYS! This event is part of the Museum’s Late Thursdays programming, made possible in part by Heather and Paul G. Haaga Jr., Class of 1970. Additional support for this program has been provided by the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, a partner agency of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Curtis W. McGraw Foundation.  

English, Mirror cover: Scenes of lovers, 1340–60. Ivory. Princeton University Art Museum. Gift of Mrs. Albert E. McVitty