Story Archive

This summer an exhibition of photography celebrates the transformative impact of David H. McAlpin (1897–1989), Class of 1920.

The Society of Architectural Historians has awarded the 2016 Philip Johnson Exhibition Catalogue Award to Katherine A. Bussard, Alison Fisher, and Greg Foster-Rice for The City Lost & Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980.

As The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980 enters its final weeks, I have been reflecting on the impact of the ideas and art featured in the project. Throughout the run of the exhibition this spring, a range of programs gave us the opportunity to see how the photographs, films, city plans, and other objects on view laid the groundwork for politically and socially engaged art practices in the 1980s and beyond.

The American city of the 1960s and 1970s witnessed seismic physical changes and social transformations, from shifting demographics and political demonstrations to the aftermath of decades of urban renewal. The works on view in The City Lost and Found blur the lines between art, activism, and journalism and demonstrate the deep connections between art practices and the political, social, and geographic realities of American cities in a tumultuous era.

The exhibition’s three curators, Katherine Bussard, Alison Fisher, and Greg Foster-Rice, sat down with Anna Brouwer, associate editor at the Museum, to discuss the show and the curatorial process.

Acconci was one of a host of different actors—artists, photographers, architects, filmmakers, planners, and activists—who responded to the city and the activity in the streets. Their work is featured in the groundbreaking exhibition The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980, which examines creative responses to dramatic urban changes through the intersection of photography, film, architecture, and urban planning. Organized in collaboration with the Art Institute of Chicago, where it is on view through January 11, 2015, the exhibition focuses on the interconnections of art practices and civic life in the nation’s three largest cities during the 1960s and 1970s.

The City Lost & Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960–1980 examines creative responses to dramatic urban changes through the intersection of photography, film, architecture, and urban planning. 

In anticipation of the exhibition Minor White: Manifestations of the Spirit, opening at the J. Paul Getty Museum on July 8, Katherine A. Bussard, Peter C. Bunnell Curator of Photography at the Princeton University Art Museum, and former curator Peter C. Bunnell discuss the Art Museum’s Minor White Archive.

Joel Meyerowitz, Hills, Dusk, 1991. Vintage chromogenic contact print, 19.4 x 24.4 cm. Gift of M. Robin Krasny, Class of 1973 (2012-116)

Joel Meyerowitz first started shooting color photographs in the late 1960s, both in New York City and on trips overseas, but it was his Cape Light series from a decade later that brought him national recognition. Thanks to a generous gift of nine Meyerowitz prints dating from 1977 to 1998 by M. Robin Krasny, Class of 1973, the Princeton University Art Museum is now able to share some of this historic work with students, scholars, and visitors.

Before my internship at the Princeton University Art Museum, I thought that accessing art images was as simple as searching titles in Google.