Collections Themes

  • /es/node/1738606 Kenji Ishiguro 石黒 健治. Boy with Hula Hoop. 1959. Gelatin silver print.

    Kenji Ishiguro: Photographing Continuity through Discontinuity

    This online collection presents a selection of photographs by Kenji Ishiguro (b. 1935) in the Museum's collection that show urban change in Japan. Taken in Tokyo between 1958 and 1960, these photographs reflect a period of instability, rearrangement, and upheaval in the city.

  • /es/node/1725721 Linocut print depicting Harriet Tubman directing a group of fugitive slaves along a path of the Underground Railroad.

    Representing Slavery: Rereading the Visual Narrative

    Explore a digital exhibition for AAS 349, Seeing to Remember: Representing Slavery Across the Black Atlantic.

  • /es/node/1711556 Moonlight at Ohashi Bridge

    Not Just a Bridge: Works from the Museum Collections

    This online collection considers bridges not merely as structures but also as important visual cues and metaphors: they join what is separated; they increase communication; they facilitate circulation; they are social and cultural constructions, as well as feats of engineering. 

  • /es/node/1709881 Minetta Good, Artist at Work

    Populist Printmaking: Works from the WPA Graphic Arts Division

    Explore themes that emerge from across the Museum's collection of prints from the New York City Graphic Arts Division of the WPA Federal Art Project. 

  • /es/node/1666736

    The Art of Asia's Diasporas and the Asian-American Experience

    This resource explores works from the Museum’s collections by Asian American artists, American artists working in Asia and/or in an Asian style, and Asian artists working in America.

  • /es/node/1666731

    The Many Powers of Gold: Akan Art

    This resource explores works by Akan artists of present-day Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire.

  • /es/learn/explore/collections-themes/art-africa-and-its-diasporas

    Art of the African Diaspora

    Explore works in the collection by artists of African descent as well as non-African artists’ imaginings of Africa and its diasporas.